Wine

Thread: Wine

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  1. #1
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    Wine

    Any other PUA's out there into wine? There was once a discussion on it, but it seemed to evaporate...like my Blanc de Noir last week.



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    wine is oen thign i would love to know more about
    ill be checking this thread on the regular
    " I Fucked Like A Puma Last Night"

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    yeah me. wine.com or wineclub down in the Irvine area..Sometimes Whole foods market.

    I cook a lot of seafood so i'm into a lot of white wines to pair.

    I've had the 500$ 98 and 99 pointers b/c my brother bought them, but at the time I could not appreciate them.. what a waste!!!!!!!!!
    FunnypeoplertheonlypeopleIevergetreallyinterestedi n, becauseassoonassomebodyisn'tfunny,theyboreme.Butif thebigattractionforUishavingsomebodybefunny,urunin toa problem,becausebeingfunnyisnotbeingsexy,sointheend , nearthemomentoftruth,urnotreallyattracted,ucan'tre allydo It.

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    There's a ton of books on the topic. Online is a good source. I think that it takes a long time to know quality, the vintages, what is special about port wines, getting away from the sweet lights and acquiring a taste for reds, differences in the processes of how they make wine, and where they're stored affects its flavor in a big way. I'm still learning and have a long way to go. There's wine tasting going on in a lot of different places (sometimes wine tasting at the place is more atmosphere than quality of the product), and wineries are in a lot of places now. Ask a lot of questions at the tastings. All wineries have mailing lists for their specials and events going on. It can be an inexpensive hobby but can also go into the millions for those with cellars.

    See if there's a wine taste going on in the area.

    Celebrities put their names to wine product. Lead singer from Tool owns a vineyard in Sedona AZ (Merkin Vineyards) but he puts them out in very limited runs. Francis Ford Coppola has good wine and in Napa has a winery that is also part memorabilia museum. 25 bucks for admission though, just a heads up.

    If you do go, make sure you are prepared to spill and have something to remove the stain with. They should have something.

    Running game at wineries and tastings could also factor in to this topic. The servers are usually cute. Barely 21 HBs I think would be impressed with going there because it's got a romantic vibe already, if you sound like you know your stuff it's impressive to someone who was drinking Boone's. When the weather is nicer, there is usually live music going on. Make sure you're pacing yourself. Napa/Sonoma you can wind up being faded big time, there's so many places to go. But the wine limos you run in to drunken AMOGs a lot, but it's a way more subdued atmosphere so blowing him out of the water should be easier.

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    I was interested too. Its a big dark area and you need a little guidance just to sort out and come up with a plan. I went to the bookstore and checked into the books one really good one is Kevin Zraly's "Windows on the World Complete Wine Course" Its written in almost a textbook fashion. I learned alot, how to read a label, they're different from different countries. The different types of wines. American wine are named by the grape. European wine is named after the region.
    Its easy really. I've come to realize that I'll never be a sommelier. I have the knowledge to know that I can buy a cheap er...inexpensive wine and there is nothing wrong with that. (I'm not talking Boones or Rossi either, I mean Sutter Home, Yellow Tail, etc.) Some wine is cheaper than other 'cause they make more of it not because it's less qwality.

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    Another thing worthy to note. Red wine should not be room temperature and white wine should not be refrigerator temperature. I got this from Wines.com
    Its a general rule and could fluctuate based on varieitals.
    A general rule of thumb:
    Red wine, 65 degrees (F).
    White & rose wine, 55 degrees (F).
    Champagne & other bubbly, 45 degrees (F).

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    I work at a winery. Girls like it when someone knows about wine. I think it conveys a classy and sophisticated style.

    cheers.

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    Quikness- good points. Invest in a wine fridge, they're not that big.
    echos - Yes but people need to stay within what they know if there are experts around. To know more than most in the room will be a benefit when HBs are buzzed and can't tell the difference between what they're drinking.

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    Yup. I got a wine fridge. Very nice Danby with two setting top for Reds, Bottom for whites. It holds about 30 bottles. Black with glass door. Got the last one off the showroom floor for the low-low price of $300.

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    Qwikness,
    Room Temperature IS about 65 degrees, and a Refrigerator sits at about 50.
    Red= Room Temp.
    White= Fridge. This is not exact, but it's as close as the average person is going to get.


    I enjoy the lighter Reds such as Pinot Noir and some Red Zins. When with a girl, I like to share a sweeter white such as Reisling or Gerwurtztraminer. I am no expert but everything I learn enhances my appreciation, I recommend everyone invest a little in a wine book.
    "Losers whine about trying their best, Winners go home and fuck the prom queen."

    Learn to Lucid Dream

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    Room Temperature IS about 65 degrees, and a Refrigerator sits at about 50.
    Red= Room Temp.
    White= Fridge.


    Not where I'm from. In Georgia it gets pretty hot and the temperature fluctuate.
    And a fridge is about 35-39 degrees not 50.
    Let me point out that was Wines.com recommendation, some books suggest a different temperature setting. Some go so far as a recommending different temperature for different varietals. Regardez http://www.wineintro.com/basics/temperatures.html Mine is set at @ 62-63 and is very nice. Notice the temperature listing for a Refrigerator.
    The corks are also important to consider. A wine refrigerator keeps the cork fairly moist so they do not dry out. If a cork dries out, air gets to the wine and spoils it, turning it to vinegar.

    Pinot Noir, Red Zins, Chianti are my favs.
    The Sutter Home Zinfandel is reaally good.
    Any Chianti.
    My girlfriend likes the Cavit Pinot Grigio.
    Girls generally like whites.
    Last edited by Satyre; 02-2007-06 at 08:52 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Qwikness View Post
    Room Temperature IS about 65 degrees, and a Refrigerator sits at about 50.
    Red= Room Temp.
    White= Fridge.


    Not where I'm from. In Georgia it gets pretty hot and the temperature fluctuate.
    And a fridge is about 35-39 degrees not 50.
    In Cali, Room Temperature is about Perfect. My fridge is about....hold on....43 degrees.
    White is for girls that come by anyway, they don't know the difference.

    Quote Originally Posted by Qwikness View Post
    Any Chianti.
    I am just starting to appreciate it and I've been drinking Reds for awhile now. Chianti, as well some Cabs and most Merlots, take time to find a taste for. At least in my experience...
    "Losers whine about trying their best, Winners go home and fuck the prom queen."

    Learn to Lucid Dream

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    We had a Pinot Noir last night, from my little fidge. I think think it could have been a little cooler. I'm gonna turn the temp down a little more for the reds, to about 61. and see. Still experimenting with this thing. Just got it in mid-January.
    From my experience girls don't like reds for two reasons. Reds are often to hot AND it turns their teeth purple.
    I learned about Chianti when I was in California (Monterey). A wine tasting had something called Sangiovese. It was great. I came home and couldn't find it anywhere. When I went to Italy and asked for it they didn't know either. Turns out Chianti is made from the Sangiovese grape. Chianti is a region in Italy and the wine kept that name over here.
    It used to be considered cheap (in the bad way) but the rep is getting better.
    The best Chiantis are Chianti Classico.

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    I had a good Pinot Noir the other night. Little Penguin. Light, Subtle good aftertaste. Anybody got any recs?

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    GQ has a wine article in the latest issue.
    FunnypeoplertheonlypeopleIevergetreallyinterestedi n, becauseassoonassomebodyisn'tfunny,theyboreme.Butif thebigattractionforUishavingsomebodybefunny,urunin toa problem,becausebeingfunnyisnotbeingsexy,sointheend , nearthemomentoftruth,urnotreallyattracted,ucan'tre allydo It.

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    I saw the article in GQ...I had to goto the library to read it (what a nerd).
    It was good. Basically what it said was, Just drink what you like. It did mention some vintages as general rule of thumb. But I ain't got time to be remembering no dates on wine! and I'm a History major!

    People get hung up on what to drink with what food. Chiken and phish are good with wite butt if you know the less hearty reds you can drink that too.
    Or you can be a rebel and drink Caberbet Sauvignon with fish or whatever. It don't make no nevermind.

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    Daily Pics

    A good link to the Wine Spectator's daily tips for under 15$ bottles, when to drink (as in, should you cellar it, or drink it now)

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    This thread is making me thirsty

    Hey all. Check out the website winelibrary.com. Not only do they have a HUGE selection of wines at great prices, but the operations director has a vlog that is very educational, which is updated several times per week. I've learned more from Wine Library TV than any book.

    And yeah, chicks definitely like white wine better than red. My gf loves white wine, so every weekend I buy something different. This weekend is a Sainte Croix Viognier. $5 at Trader Joe's! I love that place. BevMo is good, too.

    Cheers!

  19. #19
    MrEsquire Guest

    I have read that a good rule of thumb for getting the right temperature for red wines is to keep them at room temperature, but throw the bottle in the fridge for 20 minutes right before consumption.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuddenDiplomat View Post
    Check out the website winelibrary.com. Not only do they have a HUGE selection of wines at great prices...This weekend is a Sainte Croix Viognier. $5 at Trader Joe's! I love that place. BevMo is good, too.

    Cheers!
    We in Georgia can not buy wine and have it shipped to us. So unforutnately no cool wine clubs or discounts.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrEsquire View Post
    I have read that a good rule of thumb for getting the right temperature for red wines is to keep them at room temperature, but throw the bottle in the fridge for 20 minutes right before consumption.
    That's true, red is definately better cooler but those 20 minutes are a long wait when you and others want a glass. I've read that it is better left in a fridge than out for various reasons but you should let it warm to get the right taste. that's a long wait too. Its best to pour it and warm it by cupping the glass in your hand. It does taste different at different temperatures.

    I took some crap back i got from Christmas from the Crate and Barrell. I got a decanter. It was a little uppity to get but with the exchange at least I didn't have to pay for it. It's pretty great. Really sophisticated looking. Pour that wine down the spout, it looked good as hades. It's 'sposed to be good for the wine to let it "airate" and It was good.

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    If you like lighter reds try a Cote du Rhone from 2003 or 2004. For some reason, French and Italian wines seem smoother than American wines.


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    wines

    Here are some good affordable wines that I've found, does anyone else have any specific suggestions? I drink mostly reds, but my favorite whites are rieslings.

    Archetype Syrah
    R.H. Phillips (anything)
    Joel Gott (anything)
    A Mano Primitivo
    Amphorum Riesling
    Norton Malbec
    Bogle Petite Syrah
    Marquis Philips Cabernet Savignon

    Enjoy

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    2001 Château de Lancyre Coteaux du Languedoc Pic St. Loup Vieilles Vignes. Should run under $20/bottle.

    Thank me later.


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    Sterling Pinot Noir was great at about $12.

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    Yeah, GQ's article on wine tips were good, what the good and bad years are, completely agree about Australian wines not having a bad year, and agree about BevMo as a good deal. I was schooled on what the big deal with port wines are over the winter.. it's not for everyone.

    If an outlet sells wines exclusively, you know the tastings are going on frequently, and they're usually helpful in helping you navigate into finding what you're going to really like.

    Tons of reading material including a "Dummies" book. If you're taking a trip, chances are there's going to be a winery there.

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    I drink mostly Australian wines....yellowtail and Matties Perch. Excellent wines and very affordable too. I dont have expensive taste when it comes to wine

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    My pick is Blackstone merlot-Blackstone cabernet sauvignon.

    Depending where you go, it goes for 4-8 a bottle.

    It always gets good reviews and tastes great.

    When it comes to wine I prefer the reds, I hate white wine.

    I do enjoy champagne--dry or extra dry. My dad just gave me two jumbo bottles of it (but they were Brut...what am I to do? )

    Pink champagne adds a taste of fun and class if you have a woman coming over to play.


    -cheez avenger
    Last edited by cheez avenger; 09-2007-01 at 10:43 AM.
    Look far and wide--there are worlds to conquer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cheez avenger View Post
    My pick is Blackstone merlot-Blackstone cabernet sauvignon.

    Depending where you go, it goes for 4-8 a bottle.

    It always gets good reviews and tastes great.

    When it comes to wine I prefer the reds, I hate white wine.

    I do enjoy champagne--dry or extra dry. My dad just gave me two jumbo bottles of it (but they were Brut...what am I to do? )

    Pink champagne adds a taste of fun and class if you have a woman coming over to play.


    -cheez avenger

    I'm going to have to try that Blackstone Cab, I've been wanting to branch out and try some new stuff. The bottles I usually buy are around 5-7 too. You can never go wrong pre-gaming with a good bottle of Red

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    Catena Malbec 2003. Should go for abour 20 bucks. Very very good stuff.


    Hey guys, this question may be a little bit off, but what music would you put in a wine store? I am working on one and not very sure which music to play.

    cheers.

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    Depends on the vibe you're going for, but I'd say 50s-60s jazz would be a solid choice for the wine crowd.

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    echos - depends on the age you want to attract. You can change it up, just make sure it isn't interfering with conversations. Also consider having local musicians coming in and playing for tips or for a few bucks at the door. Also gives them a chance to sell their music. Usually wineries close down at 5PM and reopen for live music.

    But don't forget to sell apparel, books, snacks and wine glasses with the store logo on it (people like souvenirs and wine glasses with the logo..if you can include them in the tasting, great). I'd want to scour other wineries and wine stores and see how they're doing. If it's far enough out of the area that you're not competition, they'll prob. give some good tips.

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    i had a date the other week and bought some wolf blass chardonay from 2003 or something wahtever

    went over realllll big
    " I Fucked Like A Puma Last Night"

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    A pinot gris from New Zealand. You might suspect me of bias, but try one for yourself and see if you agree. (I don't know how much NZ wines go for overseas, but they're generally quite affordable here.)

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    I have not read the previous wine posts, so I don't know if its been discussed.


    Another great discovery, but some already knew about it.


    Charles Shaw wine AKA 2 buck chuck. Yes, Trader Joes stocks it at 1.99 a bottle! It's a corked wine, and comes in a variety.


    Merlot, Carbenet, and Shiraz.

    I had some Merlot, and Carbenet with a lady friend this morning and it was EXCELLENT!!! Next time I go to Trader Joes, I'm getting a case!

    1.99? Are you serious?

    Ashley, we're making a Trader Joes run, hun!!!!
    Look far and wide--there are worlds to conquer.

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    i havnt really read the previous messages but a great wine that is loved by the ladies and only 11 in michigan is "Twin Valley's Moscato" jus scratch the price tag off and the ladies will think this is a great tasting expensive wine... enjoy

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    Wine Tasting = Great date. If your going to LTR a girl, bring her AND her friends so that you can befriend the obstacles. Its a low pressure. Easily a good time. Make it a relaxing day.

    Many girls don't like wine. But most girls have had wine coolers. Recommend to them that they try the sparkling wines. Many of them are flavored. Wine coolers are a little differet, as they are made with malt liquor. But it tastes the same. They'll like it.

    Get your friends and go on a wine tour. Many limo companies have inexpensive wine tours ($40-70 a person) and it usually includes limo transportation to and from several different wineries, and a luncheon. Some even include the actual wine tasting fees at each winery.

    I love heavy reds.

    My favorite wine is Carmel Road - Pinot Noir. Try this with a steak, asparagus and garlic mash potatoes. Holy shit my stomach is growling. It goes for about $20 a bottle, some supermarkets have it. If not, try Beverages & More. They have it for sure. Most likely you will only find this wine in high end fine dining restaurants.

    If you got the $$ to shell out, get a bottle of Silver Oak - Cabernet. There are two versions, Napa Valley and Alexander Valley. BOTH are really really good. But they retail @ $100-220 a bottle.

    For whites I like Clos Du Bois - Chard. Its not too expensive ($9-12 a bottle). Most restaraunts will have this on the menu @ $5.50-7 a glass.

    For sparkling wine I like Martini & Rossi - Asti. Its not a flavored wine but it stil has sort of a fruity taste.

    Also worth mentioning -- A lightly carbonated chard called "Obsession". (about $10 a bottle). Great stuff. Serve lightly chilled. -- All the house wines @ Olive Garden are good and inexpensive ($4-5 a glass)
    Just a 'hard' workin man...

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    Word up on the Clos du Bois. Everything they bottle is like magic.


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    Clos du Bois

    The Clos du Bois Marlstone is phenomenal; a great Sonoma meritage blend. It's pricey, though, in the $40-$50 range. I love those blends, including the Girard Artistry, BV Tapestry, Sterling SVR, Chappellet Mountain Cuvee...

    The only Clos du Bois I wasn't thrilled with was the Pinot Noir. I wasn't bad, but I found it a bit thin. It was a fair deal for the price, though.

    I've found some drinkable-while-young Bordeaux, too, which are fairly well-priced, including Gruaud Larose and Ch. Du Tertre.

    Keep drinking, boys!

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    I have the unique advantage of living (my california apartment) 30 minutes from Napa county. I can get some of the best wines at about 40% the price if I go direct to the source. I've picked some favorites from the SF bay area.


    -Solaris Cab. (Napa) Very affordable at 10-12 bucks and a VERY nice body.
    -Gnarly Head Old Vine Zin (Lodi) Another Steal at 15-18 bucks, its very soft, sweet, fruity, and a great thing to have on hand for those who dont drink wines normally.
    -Sinta Cab, Zin, Pinot (Napa)- These get a little more pricey @ 40-50 a bottle, and are very hard to comeby (the reserves run out quickly) but if you are into wine, this is it!

    And I just have to brag right now, I was looking through my stock, and I have a 1981 Napa County Wine Guild Winner (Is a Pinot from a vinyard that doesnt exist). Im waiting to open it, but at 26 years, Its about ready to peak.
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    One of my favorite things to do if i'm cooking a dinner for a HB is to ask the people at the wine store what they would pair with the food i'm cooking. They usually come up with some very interesting wines that i've never heard of but which work really good with my meal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cheez avenger View Post
    I have not read the previous wine posts, so I don't know if its been discussed.


    Another great discovery, but some already knew about it.


    Charles Shaw wine AKA 2 buck chuck. Yes, Trader Joes stocks it at 1.99 a bottle! It's a corked wine, and comes in a variety.


    Merlot, Carbenet, and Shiraz.

    I had some Merlot, and Carbenet with a lady friend this morning and it was EXCELLENT!!! Next time I go to Trader Joes, I'm getting a case!

    1.99? Are you serious?

    Ashley, we're making a Trader Joes run, hun!!!!
    yes!
    two buck chuck is the man
    and apparently his wine is very good for the price!

    w00t w00t
    " I Fucked Like A Puma Last Night"

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    There's one that's made in Italy - Gabidy Gadi. I like this brand of red wine because I like its bitterness, fragrance, sourness and also the feeling of it when it slides down my throat. I like all areas of it. When I open the bottle and leave it there for a while, it seems to have a dramatic change... like a woman who changes a face after putting on make-up. It's cheap and it's the best, that's why I like to share it with friends.
    Last edited by SelfishPrick; 01-2008-13 at 05:39 PM. Reason: I am a perfectionist.
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    Hey Guys,

    I recommend purchasing the book "Wine for Dummies". It's an easy read, and very informative. I've taken the wines course here at school and have some informative handouts if anyone is interested (pm me). I'll try to find some good videos on the topics.

    Among my favorites are:

    Vouvray (it's a Chenin Blanc from France)
    Riesling (a series of sweet white wines typical from Germany)
    Sauternes (Sweet wines from the East-Southeast of France)
    Any wine from producer Catena (especially his argentine Malbecs(red wine))

    Guys, the best peice of advice i can give you that i learned from my professor. If you enjoy a particular bottle of wine, turn it over and read who the importer is. That importer will always have similar tastes when choosing wines to import. When you go back to the store, ask for that particular importer's wines. You'll be surprised how well he conforms to your palate.





    And now for interesting little tidbits which are always cool to drop (i.e. - can be modified into routines):

    1)
    The reason Red wines are red is actually because of the grape skin used in fermentation. Most people think red grapes = red wine, and white grapes = white wine, but red grapes can also produce rose & white wines. A good example of this is White Zinfandel

    2)
    If the wine is Riesling:

    Several German wines are actually grown on slopes that are so steep, people have actually lost their lives to cultivate the vine (some video stated this, still need to make sure if its true). The reason they grow these vines on the steep hills is that they increase wine production (figure that you have more space on the hypotnuse of the triangle then the opposite flat side), and also, it is rich in microclimates. There is a river that bends at the base of several of these slopes which actually assists in reflecting sunlight, so you have the sunlight from up above and the redirected sunlight off the water. Crazy!

    But here is the really awesome part:

    You know how grapes turn super sweet as they become raisins? Well... these Rieslings are so sweet because they very often leave the grapes on the vine for extended periods of time. The usual harvest will bring a certain price point, but they also categorize certain wines based on how long after the original harvest they have been left on the vine (usually a two week period to the next higher category)... Well, why don't they do this all the time if it will bring in more money per bottle? well, the reason is that the german climate is so unpredictable, that doing so can risk your harvest and you may not produce as much output as you would like. The german laws have a regulation as to how much you can output at these higher levels, but it's so hard to reach those outputs, that they virtually serve no purpose. In fact, the sweetest grapes have been left out so long that they actually grow ice over the vine. They must actually go out and hand pick the grapes to be used on the wine.

    p.s. - (the greatest part guys.... imo, girls tend to love sweet wines, and rieslings are actually really inexpensive for the amount of time and effort these wine producers put into their wine. the class of 800 students was polled, and approx. 95% enjoyed rieslings.)

    3)
    If you are serving/being served Champagne:

    Champagne can only be called champagne if it is from that region of France, any where else and it is called Sparkling Wine. In fact, they have such stringent rules that the French actually gauge how much pressure goes into the bottle. The bottle must be sealed with 5.5 atm of pressure.. enough to shoot the cork at 38-40 mph!(i think it can shoot faster) So when you open a bottle of champagne, you see that it has a metal end over the cork with a twisted metal tie. even THAT is regulated! It must have 6 revolutions of the metal wires!
    p.s. - the rules and regulations of winemaking are very strict depending on the region. every year, a winemaker may be imprisoned for violating strict rules in attempts to cheat the system.

    I hope this helps guys... let's keep this article active, it's a good one! my post is rather general, but feel free to add to it if i missed some stuff. anyone else have interesting pieces of information on wine?

    -WR
    "Follow The White Rabbit"

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    One wine that I have found that has gone over well with the ladies is a Pinot Grigio called Santa Margharita. I've had at least three women (ok, my sister is one!) see it in my wine fridge and say "oh my god, this is my favorite, no one ever has this!!!".

    I personally don't like white wine, but keep it handy for obvious reasons.

    If you like red cabernets - try out Oberon. My personal favorite and most of the chicks I have over enjoy it too. Just make sure you decant and aerate it very well first, then it tastest delicious.

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    Kendall Jackson Camelot Syrrah has to be my favorite.
    Who is ninja? I am ninja.

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    Stag's leap merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. my favorites
    oh yea, and can't forget Gabbiano Merlot.
    Caution: The above post may contain ridiculous amounts of sarcasm. The following quote, however, contains none.

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    Used to work in a big wine restaurant. I'll work on a list of "good, but cheap" wines for more casual drinking.

    I recommend always keeping around 1-2 bottles of "good stuff" and letting them age a bit. Break them out for a special occasion.

    If girls know you've been holding a bottle in reserve, opening it up in celebration of something can earn you a truly retarded amount of "bonus points"...for drinking something you were dying to drink anyways! Win-win.

    -CK

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    I need a little advice, a good friend and fellow PUA is moving into his new flat and I wish to gift him some wine as a warming present.

    But I'm uncertain if I should go for a single, expensive, drink on a special occasion, bottle.

    Or a selection of cheeper but still good wine for more casual drinking.

    I know very little about wine, so any pointers or suggestions?

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    • Buy wholesale.
    • Unless either you or he/she really likes white wine, err towards reds. Don't go too big, or too dry. Something approachable, like a merlot, a red zinfandel, or a meritige will go nicely.
    • Experiment! Don't be afraid to try something new.


    Off hand, I'd recommend Concha y Toro's Don Melchor, Flora Springs Trilogy (blend, and an old favorite of mine), or Mollydookers Blue Eyed Boy (shiraz). Both Stag's Leap and Frog's Leap make a good Merlot. All of these wines usually rate in the high 80s, low 90s, and I'm pretty sure all of these can be had for $50 or less. Some are in the $30s. In restaurants, they can all go for $90-130 a bottle, depending on the mark up. Knowing where to shop is key.

    Call around some. Compare prices. I use Costco, personally, but I also found a local wholesaler who has a much bigger selection.

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    I know this is an old post, but the best thing to do is go for a period of time trying different types of wine out and find the one you like the best for yourself.

    I don't think the cost is as important as your enjoyment of it, BUT I do think one of the things you can do is get you and your bros to pitch in and try different ones out. Everyone buy one bottle, some crackers, and a pitcher of water, and start making a list up. Do this once or twice a week, and just write down what you thought of it. If you know there's a type you can't stand, then cross that off your list. I went from white zin to cabs and merlot and have stayed there ever since. If you get into the reds, then pick up a port wine and hold on to it, bury it in the back of a cabinet somewhere or keep it in a safe place. If you get 2, you can sell the other one off or hold on to it for a gift. It comes across as an expensive gift in 10 years time, cost you 10-20 bucks when you first picked it up. So for that special occasion, it's a nice thing to give. Just remind them of how long they have to wait to crack it open, or call the winery and ask them when is the best time to open it.

    Once you have developed a sense of what you like, THEN get a bottle or two of moderate to expensive wines. You're going to taste the difference when you work your way up and do it over time, and can go through a restaurant menu and know exactly what's on there. It's pretty funny and almost upsetting when you go to an expensive restaurant with a date, and the wine list is mediocre, because you expected more, and you're laughing because what you saw for 30 bucks a few hours ago is 80 bucks on the list.

    I like it when guys just starting their wineries are out promoting, but when it's celebrities promoting wine (this is a big side business for celebs), treat it as a collectible and a novelty until you've given it a try or it's been reviewed.

    For an apartment/flat, just go with table wine you're going to pop open that night. When he gets a house and he has a place to stash wine, then go with something he can save like a bottle of port. It's going to get consumed pretty quickly and might get lost in the move later.. a nice bottle of champagne is better for a housewarming gift, and give a toast. If you and a couple of friends chip in on a bottle of high end champagne, they're probably going to hold on to the bottle as a memento of the occasion.

    And that's the best purpose of an expensive bottle of wine or champagne. To be shared amongst close friends and loved ones.

    Quote Originally Posted by NoDachi View Post
    I need a little advice, a good friend and fellow PUA is moving into his new flat and I wish to gift him some wine as a warming present.

    But I'm uncertain if I should go for a single, expensive, drink on a special occasion, bottle.

    Or a selection of cheeper but still good wine for more casual drinking.

    I know very little about wine, so any pointers or suggestions?

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    Does anybody hear anthing about ice wines?

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    Ice wine is the english version of the german wine-type Eiswein.

    It's a sweet wine with a high sugar concentration and typically relatively low alcohol percentage, it's made by letting the grapes stay on the bushes up until the first night frost hits in, then the winemaker will pick the grapes while they're still frozen early in the morning, the fact that you have to let the grapes ripe for a long time before you're able to pick them (you have to wait for the first frost) ensures a very high sugar concentration. Furthermore the frost makes the water (and thus also the sugar) in the grape harden and concentrate in the center of the grape making it even sweeter.

    It's commonly made in colder areas: Germany, Austria, Washington & Oregon and Canada also does it.

    By the way I'll gladly answer any wine-related questions, I'm an educated waiter and sommelier-in-training, so though I'm not much of PUA yet I know tonnes of stuff about wine.

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    Matt

    How about a very general list of rules for pairing wines with foods. I know that's a bit of an in-depth question and that your expertise will cause you to look at that request with some disdain but a person like me has only heard stay with lighter wines for lighter dishes.

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    Well there's afew simple rules, they assume that you know the difference between tannins and acid though, if not try and look it up, I'm really bad at explaining it...

    All of these rules are

    For white wines:

    Fat dishes with fat wine:
    Dishes with fat elements; fat fish like salmon, cream, thick hollaindaise-based sauces (hollaindaise, mayonnaise, bearnaise etc), needs a fat and powerful wine. Fat wines are often charactised as heavy and smooth with little acid, the classical example of fat wines are the burgundy chardonnays from meusault and chassagne montrachet, most new world producers makes their chardonnays in this style, oakey, buttery and fat.

    Sweet elements with sweet elements:
    Some vegetables adds some very sweet elements to a dish (prime examples beetroot and carrots) alot of people also like to use various berries for starters, these elements should preferably be matched with sweetness in the wine, this is pretty easy when working with new world wines because most producers (especially american) go for abit of sweetness in the wine, oakey wines convey abit of sweetness, but the classical example of white wine with the sweet element is riesling made in a german style (some producers make riesling in the french style in which it's very acidic and mineralic).

    Salty food with mineralic wine: Salty food can be tricky to match up with wine, salty snacks, oysters, salted hams all need minerals in the wine. Minerals as a taste can be hard to define, it's abit like a hard acidity. The easiest way around this though is champagne, champagne is very mineralic and since these very salty dishes are usually served as starters it comes natural to just drink champagne with them, other good examples of wine with a mineral taste are muscadets from loire, chablis chardonnays from northern burgundy and pinot gris/riesling from alsace made the french style (not the german style).

    For red wines:

    Red meat needs tannins: Tannins is a different kind of acidity only found in red wines, and when serving red meat tannins are required to match it. Most red wines are quite tannic so it's pretty easy.

    Power of meat matches power of wine: You can sorta rate meat in power levels, white meat (poultry and fish) is the weakest and needs very slim and elegant red wines (pinot noir and gamay (the grape used for beaujolais) is great for this), the next on the ladder is veal (again pinot noir is a great choice, smooth and elegant reds off other grapes can also be used here cabernet franc from loire, light bordeaux reds, barberas and light chiantis), then comes lamb (here you'll want to move onto the more powerful and heavy reds, syrah/shiraz, bordeaux style reds in a heavier style), and last in the ordinary types of meat is beef which should be handled by the heavily tannic wines. Horse, bear, bison, goat etc are all very powerful kinds of meat that goes beyond beef, so if you're dealing with these just go all out on powerful reds.

    Aged reds: When a redwine takes on age it will become smoother, lighter and more elegant, furthermore there's afew rules of thumb when dealing with aged reds; mushrooms are great for these and game meat also works very well with aged reds.

    For sweet wines:

    Wine sweeter than dessert: When serving dessert wine always make sure that the wine is sweeter than the dessert, I have no explanation for this it's just how it works, I've tried before doing it the other way around and it just doesn't work.

    Chocolate: Chocolate is bitter and thus alittle special, serving white dessert wine with chocolate doesn't work very well, so make sure you get a red dessert wine for chocolate, the tannins here are needed to match the bitterness of the chocolate (ports, banyuls and recioto are all good examples of red dessert wine).
    A special recommendation here for game related wine/food pairing: Women loves chocolate, it does something to them that nothing else can achieve, but very heavy red dessertwines can easily send even the toughest man asleep if he's gotten just a wee bit too much. The north italian grape Malvasia is the solution to this issue, it makes a red dessertwine which is light and sparkling and very similar to sparkling moscatos (and it tastes alot better than moscatos) it's the perfect dessertwine for summertime chocolate and strawberries.

    These are the rules of thumbs that the danish waitering academy teaches new students about wine and food pairing, they should be pretty simple and they're all the basics you need to avoid making atrocious matches. I've got two rules of thumb aswell though:

    Regional dishes with regional wines: For some reason chefs and winemakers have a instinctual connection and if you get a dish that's regional, try and match it with a wine from the same region, works wonders.

    Great wine matches great food: Aslong as the wine's fantastic and the food's too you can't fail completely.

    Hope it helps, by the way shout out if you don't understand what I mean here, I'm danish so I'm not a master of the english language, there might be plenty of grammatic/typing mistakes in there...

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    I like that kind of wines very much

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Cure View Post
    Well there's afew simple rules, they assume that you know the difference between tannins and acid though, if not try and look it up, I'm really bad at explaining it...

    All of these rules are

    For white wines:

    Fat dishes with fat wine:
    Dishes with fat elements; fat fish like salmon, cream, thick hollaindaise-based sauces (hollaindaise, mayonnaise, bearnaise etc), needs a fat and powerful wine. Fat wines are often charactised as heavy and smooth with little acid, the classical example of fat wines are the burgundy chardonnays from meusault and chassagne montrachet, most new world producers makes their chardonnays in this style, oakey, buttery and fat.

    Sweet elements with sweet elements:
    Some vegetables adds some very sweet elements to a dish (prime examples beetroot and carrots) alot of people also like to use various berries for starters, these elements should preferably be matched with sweetness in the wine, this is pretty easy when working with new world wines because most producers (especially american) go for abit of sweetness in the wine, oakey wines convey abit of sweetness, but the classical example of white wine with the sweet element is riesling made in a german style (some producers make riesling in the french style in which it's very acidic and mineralic).

    Salty food with mineralic wine: Salty food can be tricky to match up with wine, salty snacks, oysters, salted hams all need minerals in the wine. Minerals as a taste can be hard to define, it's abit like a hard acidity. The easiest way around this though is champagne, champagne is very mineralic and since these very salty dishes are usually served as starters it comes natural to just drink champagne with them, other good examples of wine with a mineral taste are muscadets from loire, chablis chardonnays from northern burgundy and pinot gris/riesling from alsace made the french style (not the german style).

    For red wines:

    Red meat needs tannins: Tannins is a different kind of acidity only found in red wines, and when serving red meat tannins are required to match it. Most red wines are quite tannic so it's pretty easy.

    Power of meat matches power of wine: You can sorta rate meat in power levels, white meat (poultry and fish) is the weakest and needs very slim and elegant red wines (pinot noir and gamay (the grape used for beaujolais) is great for this), the next on the ladder is veal (again pinot noir is a great choice, smooth and elegant reds off other grapes can also be used here cabernet franc from loire, light bordeaux reds, barberas and light chiantis), then comes lamb (here you'll want to move onto the more powerful and heavy reds, syrah/shiraz, bordeaux style reds in a heavier style), and last in the ordinary types of meat is beef which should be handled by the heavily tannic wines. Horse, bear, bison, goat etc are all very powerful kinds of meat that goes beyond beef, so if you're dealing with these just go all out on powerful reds.

    Aged reds: When a redwine takes on age it will become smoother, lighter and more elegant, furthermore there's afew rules of thumb when dealing with aged reds; mushrooms are great for these and game meat also works very well with aged reds.

    For sweet wines:

    Wine sweeter than dessert: When serving dessert wine always make sure that the wine is sweeter than the dessert, I have no explanation for this it's just how it works, I've tried before doing it the other way around and it just doesn't work.

    Chocolate: Chocolate is bitter and thus alittle special, serving white dessert wine with chocolate doesn't work very well, so make sure you get a red dessert wine for chocolate, the tannins here are needed to match the bitterness of the chocolate (ports, banyuls and recioto are all good examples of red dessert wine).
    A special recommendation here for game related wine/food pairing: Women loves chocolate, it does something to them that nothing else can achieve, but very heavy red dessertwines can easily send even the toughest man asleep if he's gotten just a wee bit too much. The north italian grape Malvasia is the solution to this issue, it makes a red dessertwine which is light and sparkling and very similar to sparkling moscatos (and it tastes alot better than moscatos) it's the perfect dessertwine for summertime chocolate and strawberries.

    These are the rules of thumbs that the danish waitering academy teaches new students about wine and food pairing, they should be pretty simple and they're all the basics you need to avoid making atrocious matches. I've got two rules of thumb aswell though:

    Regional dishes with regional wines: For some reason chefs and winemakers have a instinctual connection and if you get a dish that's regional, try and match it with a wine from the same region, works wonders.

    Great wine matches great food: Aslong as the wine's fantastic and the food's too you can't fail completely.

    Hope it helps, by the way shout out if you don't understand what I mean here, I'm danish so I'm not a master of the english language, there might be plenty of grammatic/typing mistakes in there...

    Matt, that's great, thanks mate.

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    My pleasure

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    My family has a winery in Santa Barbara County, if anyone has more specific questions, shoot, and if you are cool and in the area, hit me up, if I like you I could probably hook you up big time

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    great post Matt, thank you.

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    All the wine events are going on right now. I know a lot of wineries changed hands in the past year or two due to the economy.

    Also have a few movies to recommend:
    "Sideways" - if you haven't seen it, see it.
    "Wine for the Confused" - just a basic 101. John Cleese is in it.
    "Mondovino" - documentary on the wine biz & wine wars.
    "Bottle Shock" - based on the beginnings of the California wine industry. Plus Alan Rickman's in it. Don't compare it to "Sideways". You might want to see this one first...
    and "Blood Into Wine". Tool fans will like this because Maynard James Keenan is in it, but it's a good look at a startup wine company.

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    I enjoy wines. I'm not an expert, but I usually drink a glass every night or two.

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    wine is good
    may i make a recommendation?

    white wine --- reisling

    red wine ---- merlot

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    I'm very into wine, I take my first dates to wine bars, it screams class, and I can wow them with my wine knowledge. I acquired a great deal of knowledge from having been a server at a wine bar for 1.5 years, but there are tons of online guides out there to study.

    The real way to learn wine is to TRY WINES. Many wine bars give samples... and it's very common for people to write in notepads what they like, for future reference.
    http://www.theattractionforums.com/sex/141465-why-you-need-quit-porn-now.html

    Women have two types of toys: teddy bears and vibrators. Teddy bears are for when they are emotional and want to watch romcoms, and vibrators for when they want to get off. What toy are you?

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    I suggest Italian wines (OBVIOUSLY, no disrespect for French/Califronian/Australian wines):

    1. Pinto Griggio (goes great with appetizers, white meat and fish) costs a bit.
    2. Sangue Di Giuda (trans. Blood Of Judas) This is a VERY sweet wine red. goes well with a cheese and wine app.
    3. Fragolino, this is a red wine. Very sweet but goes well with dessert.
    4. Chianti ('nuff said)

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimG View Post
    I suggest Italian wines (OBVIOUSLY, no disrespect for French/Califronian/Australian wines):

    1. Pinto Griggio (goes great with appetizers, white meat and fish) costs a bit.
    2. Sangue Di Giuda (trans. Blood Of Judas) This is a VERY sweet wine red. goes well with a cheese and wine app.
    3. Fragolino, this is a red wine. Very sweet but goes well with dessert.
    4. Chianti ('nuff said)
    I personally find Sangue de Giuda disgusting- a bit like half-flat Dr. Pepper- but chicks LOVE IT, so it's a winning suggestion. Good luck finding it, though, I've always wanted to keep a bottle around for the girls.

    A few of my faves:
    Crios Torrontes - Torrontes grapes were brought back from extinction, it's a very light, summery white.
    Guenoc Cab - Ridiculously undepriced
    Seghesio Old Vine Zin (most old vine Zins are excellent)
    Bogle Petite Syrah
    X Rated red blend
    BR Cohn Silver Cab
    BV Reserve
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    It depends what Sangue Di Giuda you have tried, there are different qualities. Always go D.O.C quality when you can, that should come directly from Broni (a town 20 minutes away from where I live).

    [edit: There is some really weird fluff around Sangue Di Guida: The legend around it says that after his death , Judas, was so ridden with guilt for betraying Jesus that Jesus decided to pardon him and release him from hell. So Judas was ressurected back to earth and appeared in the city of Broni (Home of the wine). The people of Broni recognized Judas and tried to kill him in order to vendicate the death of Jesus. But Judas preformed a mircale by curing the vineyards of Broni from a pestilence. And in reward the people of Broni dubbed their best wine with the name of Judas. Just in case anyone might need this ... extra info never hurts.]

    As for the wines you have mentioned, I can't say that any of them ring a bell. But I am taking a note and will check them out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimG View Post
    It depends what Sangue Di Giuda you have tried, there are different qualities. Always go D.O.C quality when you can, that should come directly from Broni (a town 20 minutes away from where I live).

    [edit: There is some really weird fluff around Sangue Di Guida: The legend around it says that after his death , Judas, was so ridden with guilt for betraying Jesus that Jesus decided to pardon him and release him from hell. So Judas was ressurected back to earth and appeared in the city of Broni (Home of the wine). The people of Broni recognized Judas and tried to kill him in order to vendicate the death of Jesus. But Judas preformed a mircale by curing the vineyards of Broni from a pestilence. And in reward the people of Broni dubbed their best wine with the name of Judas. Just in case anyone might need this ... extra info never hurts.]

    As for the wines you have mentioned, I can't say that any of them ring a bell. But I am taking a note and will check them out.
    All I remember is that the label was pink and the bottle was kinda slender. I'm not much into frizzante, hence my clash with Sangue.
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    honestly the best red wine there is on the market is made by a company called "baron herzog"
    taste it and see how its different
    actually most of their wines are better then most!
    fact...

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    I don't know much about wines, unfortunately. I was a certified tequila goddess and that's a whole different craft. However, there are wine appreciation classes at most universities/colleges that have F&B programs. Another good way is to take a wine tasting class at a local restaurant or vineyard. Classes are a great way to understand the grapes selected but also to learn what notes you are to experience. Meetup.com is great for also finding local dining and wine tasting groups. =)


    PS

    A good way to start diving into wines is to ask yourself "do I like sweet or do I like a little spice?". Dark wines usually contain black pepper which is a spicy note while whites have a sweeter note. Also your food can completely change your wine experience. Good rule of thumb is dark with dark meats and light with light meats. This isn't 100% true all the time because it also depends on the meats preparation and glaze/sauces. Some side dish items may also collide horribly with wine notes. Always refresh your plate with water or ginger.

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    I had a gf for 3.5 years and her family had a small vineyard. I'd help them bottle wine a few times a year, and in the process I learned way more about wine than I need to peak a womans interest.

    When it comes to wine talk: Know what you like and if anyone ever asks what YOU recommend,tell them to drink what they like. So what if the waitor said that the cabernet from the who cares vineyard in 2008 goes well with that rib eye. I feel like drinking a pino.

    Some conversation facts that average box winers don't know:
    Wine goes into bottle shock when it is first bottled, which is why wine will taste different if you drink it from the barrel on a wine tour. This is because the sediments haven't settled yet.
    The oak percentage on a label refers to how new the barrel is. A newer barrell will affect the taste of the wine more than an old barrel.
    Chilling the barrell increases the ageing process of the wine.
    Even the cork effects the taste of the wine.
    Wine is yummy.

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    Everyone knows wine is yummy though.

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    velvet devil merlot all day long.

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    heard that the best wines come from france, spain and chile

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    Quote Originally Posted by boston_019 View Post
    I personally find Sangue de Giuda disgusting- a bit like half-flat Dr. Pepper- but chicks LOVE IT, so it's a winning suggestion. Good luck finding it, though, I've always wanted to keep a bottle around for the girls.
    if u dont like Sangue de Giuda then u dont know wine.. u lack class and knowledge when it comes to wine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jublez View Post
    if u dont like Sangue de Giuda then u dont know wine.. u lack class and knowledge when it comes to wine.
    Thanks for pointing that out, you're so right! I totally lack class and wine knowledge. I suppose my years of experience as an understudy to a sommelier and working in wine bars does actually mean I know nothing about wine, I can't believe I ever allowed training, knowledge, and experience to blind me from the light. All this time, I have been mistakenly thinking that wine preferences are entirely subjective.

    Please tell me that in addition to your tremendous expertise in viticulture and rhetoric, you also teach classes in basic capitalization and internet shorthand when you lecture others on class?
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    Quote Originally Posted by boston_019 View Post
    Thanks for pointing that out, you're so right! I totally lack class and wine knowledge. I suppose my years of experience as an understudy to a sommelier and working in wine bars does actually mean I know nothing about wine, I can't believe I ever allowed training, knowledge, and experience to blind me from the light. All this time, I have been mistakenly thinking that wine preferences are entirely subjective.

    Please tell me that in addition to your tremendous expertise in viticulture and rhetoric, you also teach classes in basic capitalization and internet shorthand when you lecture others on class?
    so u have "years of experience as an understudy to a sommelier, working in wine bars" yet u still lack wine knowledge.. in other words ur a loser bartender.

    please dont tell me that in all ur nerd years on the net jerking behind the monitor that u forgot what internet lingo is.

    good luck with ur extensive wine career connoisseur...

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by jublez View Post
    heard that the best wines come from france, spain and chile
    Good wine is good wine.

    Please quit instagating pointless arguments with people on the forums. You're making yourself look like a total douche bag.

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    I can guarantee that some of the best wines are not only in USA, but also in...Portugal. Portuguese wines very good - unless you are targetting something cheap.

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    The best way to learn about wine is to visit some region with the vineyards and local producers, spend 3-4 days there and taste and drink the wine with the people who really produce it. They are able to talk hours about their wine... and about anything else.. Itīs really nice experience and you can learn a lot! I visited some wine regions in Europe - in Spain (Requena), Czech republic (Moravia), France.. it was awesome!

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    Forget Spain! I think that many people dont even know the existence of Portugal - side by side with Spain - where you can find even better wines (from Alentejo region, Douro, etc) and with a good price. In fact, USA wines and other very good wines barely sell wines in Portugal.

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    There is this article I read about wine that was really intriguing. If I find it i'll post it here

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    Found it !! The article is called Wine for beginners and I think it essentially lays out all you need to know about wine to impress the opposite sex. Just make sure the person your trying to impress isn't a devout member of AA, spoken from experience.

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    I think they have wine "scorecards" or cheat sheets which cover different types of wines, glassware, vintages. There's probably 10-15 types that a restaurant will carry, fewer than that at places that have happy hour, then it's a matter of what you prefer. To me it's kind of like coffee, when you first drink coffee, you want it sweet, but over time you acquire a taste for straight black coffee. With wine, people usually start with sweet, and work their way into the dry, but most people change over time and the weather can also influence what you're drinking.

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    Yup. I got a wine fridge.

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    1. Local liquer stores sometimes carry a wine spectator free publication. Also check the sales sticker as they may incidate the rating on the shelf. These ratings give you an idea on the quality of the wine according to the industry standard.
    2. Sometimes the best wines are under $20. I like semi-sweet cheap wines from south american, spain, and africa that are not popular (aka cheap) and sangria.
    3. Definately go to a winery and try a wine flight tasting (not chugging) to understand the flavors, purpose, and your palet preference. I was out in AZ and the flight cost was $5. Most places around the US probably charge $15-20. Either way a good source of information.
    4. Understand pairings (what goes with what). Sometimes back of the bottle has information but can easily be found on the internet.
    5. If you keep wine at home, research storage as some wines dont have a long shelf life.

    Wine is a culture thing and not always an uppity class thing but is a good man knowledge skill to have. If you go to italy, spain, france it is traditional to have wine with dinner or even lunch. Wine is also used in cooking (e.g. reduction sauces). As a 2nd time bachelor, I have wine/champagne bottles of various types at home typically for guests and may use occasionally for cooking (italian, steak, tapas). When out drinking my go to drink is always beer (belgian ale) as I tend to have a bad hangover from wine. Charity events (mamosa champagne/oj), brunches (mamosa), steak dinner (cabernet). Sometimes I get the girly question on if I like wine and I just tell them my preferences. So yes, I would be the guy in the 3 piece suit drinking PBR when everone else is drinking wine.

    $00.02

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