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View Full Version : Definiteness of Major Purpose, Goals & subconcious mind



superseiyan
04-11-2006, 09:11 PM
Hi,
Disclaimer: Mods, I apologize if this is off-topic, though I think there is an interesting inner game element to it. I didn't feel it was entirely off-topic.
I'm doing the 70X7, and I'm big on writing about dreams as if I already have them (i.e. writing about the house in Miami that I live in present tense, or writing about the huge business that I have created).
I have goals and passions in life....however, ofcourse this issue of fear of women is probably the biggest shame in my entire life. It is just holding me down.
Business comes first though, as it will create me economic freedom. And being filthy rich will let you do OTHER things, the money itself is not the end, but rather what it will allow me to do (martial arts, travel, help family, etc).
This is my question. I've read of the definiteness of major purpose in "Master Key to Riches" and I've also read a lot of material on the power of the subconcsious. However, I've also heard the saying if you chase two rabbits you'll lose both.
My question is is self-defeating to simultaneously seek to aggresively improve myself in two areas of my life (relating to people in general/building a business and relating to women?).
It's not even ONs that I want, I just want to be able to talk to women in a normal fashion, get them liking me, and provide them with fun times and interactions.
Does focusing mental energy on that drain the subconcious, or can I seek to aggresively improve in as many areas as possible at the same time?

doc
04-11-2006, 09:19 PM
Of course, you can improve your life in many areas simultaneously.
You`re not chasing rabbits, you`re building a temple with many different rooms, Grasshopper.
You need to meditate and be One with the Universe.
Find a teacher and learn.
Rome was`nt built in a fucking day....lol
All of this takes time...and direction.
We are all infinite, tied together by infinite strings. You can pull what ever you want to you by choosing the correct string.

Katil
04-11-2006, 09:52 PM
I agree with Doc...
What time frame are you looking at? Give yourself the stress relief of making the change for life instead of the pressure of changing over the course of - say 30 days.
Your purpose is to be better with women, or be a better man, be an alpha male, or whatever you choose, and that is a singular goal even though it encompasses a lot of small pieces. This purpose is different than a specific goal that you are looking at for the 70X7 exercise.
For a 70X7 exercise you need to pick a specific goal to focus on, and then chose another if you like after you are finished with the first one. That exercise allows you to focus a lot of energy on the one item. So if you have a singular goal of being a PUA, then take one piece of that goal...say approaching...and use that in a 7X70. Do that for a week, take a week off, then do another exercise for a different area of being a PUA, and so on...wash, rinse, repeat.
Cheers,
Katil

CreativeWolf
04-11-2006, 09:59 PM
My question is it self-defeating to simultaneously seek to aggresively improve myself in two areas of my life (relating to people in general/building a business and relating to women?).
Does focusing mental energy on that drain the subconcious, or can I seek to aggresively improve in as many areas as possible at the same time?
First, it isn't self-defeating to seek to improve to areas at once. However, if you take one are up to the very top, that'll drag the others up with it. It'll be way easier to focus on one (if it's moving up quickly) and then when you're feeling happy, satisfied and great about yourself with this respect then the other areas tend to fall into place. It you start to stall in one area, that's the time to shift focus to bring up another area and then move back to the original when you're in a different space.
Second, there is no such thing as draining the subconcious...the beauty of this kind of mental attention and focus is...it's unlimited! And the more you use it, the more powerful a tool it becomes.