The Attraction Forums Book Club - Page 2

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  1. #11

    This was a great idea - sorry to revive an old thread, but I think the book list is worth another try.

    I submit "Why Is God Laughing" by Deepak Chopra. It is an outstanding inner game resource. It is 200 pages, but I read it in one night because I couldn't put it down. It could give you an entirely new perspective from which to view your life and your game - one in which fear and anxiety are but dust in the wind.



  2. #12

    I bought "Influence" by Robert Cialdini since Style recommended it in The Game. It also got hella good reviews on Amazon.

  3. #13

    how about we read something intelligent, something that will expand our minds and has nothing to do with self-help

    Neil's book club reads tons of heavy hitters, and i wasn't able to get in on Atlas Shrugged, so we should read the unabridged copy of that

  4. Cialdini's "Influence"

    Quote Originally Posted by GAT0R View Post
    I bought "Influence" by Robert Cialdini since Style recommended it in The Game. It also got hella good reviews on Amazon.
    I bought and read "Influence" and loved it. A must read. Really opens your mind about how easily one can be manipulated (and manipulate...) and how these things happen around us all the time. Some concepts there are already known in the seduction community (such as "social proof"), but some were new to me.
    Afterwards I bought "Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive" co-authored by Ciladini, which builds on the same ideas of Influence but breaks it into very specific techniques of influencing other people. This one is recommended as well.

  5. #15

    how can we formalize a book club? wanna do google group or smth?

  6. #16
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    My understanding was that book club was not related to Pickup and self help, i would like to discuss books that have nothing to do with pickup or self improvement.

  7. In college I got hooked on esoteric political conversation. I was mainly interested in voices from the non-establishment, non-neoconservative, and mostly non-Republican Right, because these were positions to which my teachers and fellow students were least sympathetic and that I felt I did not understand.

    I found my way to hardcore libertarian literature and from there moved steadily rightward.

    Democracy: The God That Failed, by Hans-Hermann Hoppe.

    Democracy is commonly understood as the most progressive of political arrangements, even if its flaws are sometimes glaringly evident. Hoppe argues from a harshly, insistently realistic economic perspective that, actually, democracy is decivilizing to its core, especially in its mass democratic form. This book shattered my confidence in our academic/media/political priesthood and their court religion.

    America's Great Depression, by Murray N. Rothbard.

    What are the essential causes and dynamics of economic recessions and depressions, and the business cycle. This isn't a mysterious topic--the answers are largely known. Spoiler alert: the Federal Reserve triggered the 1929 crash, and blind interventionist policies deepened and prolonged the crisis into the Depression. This was another book that contributed to my suspicion of respectable political dialogue and the "experts" who manage it.

    Multiculturalism and the Politics of Guilt, by Paul Edward Gottfried.

    Paul Gottfried was the first living historian I read whom I really understood and trusted. Gottfried's openness to inegalitarian, non-liberal thought may be a main precondition for effective historical analysis. To the extent that you are unable to take your historical subjects seriously, on their own terms, you'll have difficulty appreciating them--and it turns out that few historical figures and groups shared the updated sociopolitical pretensions of present establishment.

    Gottfried's book indicts multiculturalism as a bad-faith attack on Western civilization. It is the final installment in a trilogy of books on twentieth-century political history. I think of them as required reading. If you want something silly, stupid, and superficially upsetting to New York Times readers, there's always Ann Coulter or Glenn Beck. Gottfried is not playing a Republican PR game, and his challenges are deeper and more serious.

    These books are a start. If those speak to you, there are more breadcrumbs to follow!

  8. #18

    The Return of Depression Economics and the Wisdom of Crowds. Two great books that counter the anti democracy and Neo liberal economic myths.

    I also just read The Good Soldiers which is the best book on war I have ever read.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by DialedIn View Post
    The Return of Depression Economics and the Wisdom of Crowds. Two great books that counter the anti democracy and Neo liberal economic myths.

    I also just read The Good Soldiers which is the best book on war I have ever read.
    My impression is that Paul Krugman is aware that confidence in democracy and the culture of economic intervention is sagging, but that he never really addresses the most serious core criticisms and insights of figures like, for example, Hoppe. Krugman's take on reality strikes me as vastly more mythic than the authors I've cited here. But, to each his own!

  10. #20
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    You guys should seriously read "Power: Why Some People Have It and Others Don't" by Jeffrey Pfeffer

    This is good book for career, especially, if you're working in multi-level corporate world where getting to the top is the only way to become influential and successful. This book, unlike many self help crap out there, is written by a college professor that studied numerous successful CEOs, president and other wealthy men. Ironically, he talks about all the dirty and cheap tricks how people get on the top. Often, many would not admit to using these tactics in order to preserve their perceived appearance of innocence.
    It's very similar to 48 Laws of Power, but unlike historical references it makes, this book covers current events.

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